Libraries play an important role for families with children under the age of 18. According to a new report from Pew Research, called “Parents, Children, Libraries, and Reading,” 94 percent of parents of minors say that libraries are “important” for their children, and 79 percent said that libraries are “very important.” In addition, 84 percent of parents of kids under 6 say that libraries are “very important.”

Compared to adults without children, parents of minors are more likely to own a library card, visit a library, as well as use the library website, and connect to the library with a mobile device.  In fact, 30 percent of these parents said that they started using the library more in the past five years, because of their child.

Lee Rainie, director of the Pew Internet Project explained in a statement that parents, “do more and they are eager for more library services of every kind – ranging from traditional stuff like books in stacks and comfortable reading spaces to high-tech kiosks and more e-books and mobile apps that would allow them to access library materials while they are on the go.”

The research also revealed that parents living in households that earn less than $50,000 are more likely than parents in higher income households to say that they would be “very likely” to take advantage of new services. For instance, 44 percent of lower income parents say that they would take a class on how to download eBooks from the library, versus 29 percent of higher income parents. In addition, 40 percent said they would “very likely” take advantage of eReaders that come preloaded with library content, whereas 22 percent of higher income parents indicated that they would be very likely to.