social login, social networks, social networkingGigya introduced a SocialPrivacy Certification program that, like the organic food program, relies on audits of business practices and rewards good actors with a certification they can display.

The certification is intended for Web services that use social login services such as Facebook connect. Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, LUSH Cosmetics and Canada’s Globe and Mail are already displaying the certificate.

The certificate is displayed as users log in with their social networking accounts. To be able to display the certificate, companies cannot sell users’ social data or use it for email marketing campaigns without specific user permission. They cannot post to social feeds or send any private messages to user’s friends without user consent.

Gigya helps websites leverage social technology and “provides unparalleled customer insights for businesses,” the company says on its website.

“Consumers clearly prefer to use social login in many settings because it allows them to login quickly and securely without creating new credentials. Yet we’ve also seen that those users want transparency around how their information is being collected and used,” Patrick Salyer, CEO of Gigya, said in a statement.

The Future of Privacy Forum, whose director, Jules Polonetsky, will serve as chairman of Gigya’s advisory board for the program, released study results that suggest that users shy away from social login protocols due to privacy concerns.

On websites displaying the certification, 15 percent more users signed in using social sign-in tools than on those without, the study found. Among consumers who opted not to use social logins, 40 percent cited concerns about their personal data and 41 percent said they worried the site or application would post content to their social networking accounts without specific permission.