On the heels of influence scoring sites like Klout and Kred comes an entirely new tool for determining which social media users to follow. Prollie, which launched in beta today, doesn’t judge people by follower count or number of retweets.

“While it’s good to have influence, what we’re really measuring is who you are and what you love, whether you have 10 followers or 10,000,” say brothers Mike and Red Fabbri, who co-founded the company in New York City in 2011.

On Prollie, the person tweeting about the best brunches in New York City is much more valuable if he or she also checks into local restaurants on Foursquare and posts pictures of the food on Tumblr, the founders said.

The site connects through Twitter, Facebook , Foursquare, Tumblr, and LinkedIn (Instagram, Pinterest, and Google+ are coming soon) to surface public posts that show what each user is passionate about.

The scoring system, which assigns users a letter grade instead of a number, is also based on how well people use each platform. For instance, people who can use hashtags and user handles or add pictures on Twitter might score higher than those who just write a status update. On Facebook, the more sophisticated users mention others in their posts and add comments to the links they share.

Using Prollie, a newbie will be able to sign up for a social network and immediately know which people they should follow based on what the platform is and what they like. It was designed “for the social media lover, by the social media lover,” according to its founders, who each have experience working with brands on social media.

CEO Mike Fabbri is a former advertising executive and social media strategist who worked with luxury brands; COO and co-founder Red Fabbri was a social media producer at NBC Universal.

Right now, the company doesn’t have a defined business model, but the founders say they are not planning on selling back-end data mining. Instead, they’ll offer companies a more accurate picture of consumers through their interests.

Prollie has raised $500,000 in Series A funding.

Image by Cartoonresource.