76% Of Viewers Say Rebecca Black Attack Comments Are Justified

By now you probably know who Rebecca Black is and, if you don’t, the name probably rings a bell at least. Rebecca Black recently made her way into the limelight, YouTube-style, with her hit song ‘Friday’, which went viral last week and has already garnered around 30 million views. She’s been trending on Twitter for days and her song has surpassed Justin Bieber on the iTunes charts. But here’s the catch – Rebecca Black has gone viral for all the wrong reasons. ‘Friday’ has been touted as “The worst song in the world” and the Web has lashed out at Rebecca, writing comments on her video that are beyond mean. And the most surprising thing? According to a Good Morning America report, most viewers think the scathing comments Rebecca has received are actually okay!

Before we get to the Good Morning America report, let’s take a look at how Rebecca’s skyrocket to YouTube fame went down. The video was originally uploaded back in February, but started to go viral after it went up on the Tosh.0 blog under the title ‘Songwriting Isn’t For Everyone’, was tweeted by comedian Michael J Nelson tweeted about it, calling it the “worst video ever made”, and YouTube celebrity Ray William Johnson shared it on his Facebook page with the quote “It’s fried egg, fried egg. Gotta get down on fried egg.” It was liked by 3,537 people and commented on 4,214 times.

From there, the video took off. But so did the scathing comments and cyber bullying. As you can see from some of the Top Tweets about Rebecca Black, you can tell that she hasn’t gotten a very positive response from fans online. You’ll also notice on the YouTube video page that in addition to the nasty comments the video has got only around 14,000 likes and a whopping 115,000 dislikes.

The video has also been parodied and spoofed like crazy, including a horrible mashup in which the footage of Rebecca and her friends driving is cut with car crash footage, a Groundhog Day remix and most recently a spoof that makes fun of the fact that Rebecca Black can’t sing and had to use auto-tune to make herself sound decent in the Friday video.

But seriously, come on. Everyone uses auto-tune these days and although there’s not much denying that Friday is sort of an annoying song, I don’t think Rebecca Black has a horrible voice. It’s ridiculous to me that Rebecca Black has been trending now for over a week because the people of the Twitterverse think it’s so funny to say mean things about a 13-year old girl. Really, people?

Rebecca was interviewed on Good Morning America and talked a little bit about the mean comments on her videos. At first it bothered her, but now she’s just shrugging it off. After all, it’s a catchy song, people are talking about it and, yes, it’s rising the iTunes download charts so she’s certainly profiting from this fame, even if she’s being shown in a negative light. But I was surprised by the harshness and evil-spiritedness of some of the things people have been saying about her. She says that the worst comments she has received are along the vein of things like, “I hope you cut yourself and I hope you get an eating disorder so you’ll look pretty and I hope you go cut and die.” How does she deserve that? Check out the GMA interview below.

The most surprising thing about this situation, in my eyes, is a little statistic that GMA provides at the end of the interview. They say, “We checked online and 76% agree with the harsh attacks, saying they’re not too harsh.” The remaining 24% said, she’s just a kid, get off her back. What do you think? Obviously I disagree with all the backlash. After all, she’s just a 13-year old girl with a mediocre music video. She hasn’t forced anyone to watch it, hasn’t claimed to be the next Lady Gaga. Do you think the cyber bullying and attack comments are justified?

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