Social Media Newsfeed: Foursquare Ads | Social Media’s Effects on Student Writing

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FoursquareFoursquare Displaying Ads After Check-Ins (SocialTimes)
Foursquare is gradually rolling out post check-in intersticial advertisements, according to reports in AdAge and About Foursquare, with Captain Morgan rum as an early taker. The ads work based on the type of venue a user checks in to. The Verge There are limitations, so don’t expect obtrusive banner ads. Instead, the new ads pop up immediately after a user checks in at a particular location, and they’ll either offer a relevant suggestion or coupon. Mashable A Foursquare rep confirmed to Mashable that the ads started rolling out over the last several weeks. According to the rep, Foursquare charges on a cost-per-action basis rather than a cost-per-click basis, meaning Foursquare only makes money if users click the ad to get more information or check in to an advertiser’s physical location (such as a Toys R Us store) within a certain period of time. The Next Web Toys R US is also said to be using the system to lure in potential customers. Rather than taking the hyperlocal approach of Captain Morgan, it is using family-friendly locations (theme parks, restaurants, play areas, etc.) to push discounts of up to 20 percent in-store. AdAge Foursquare chief revenue officer Steven Rosenblatt said in an earlier interview that Foursquare will not allow brands to use post check-in ads for “conquesting;” allowing one brand to advertise to a user who checks in at a competitor’s location. If a user checks in at a restaurant, for instance, a rival eatery around the corner would not be able to serve that user a post check-in ad for half-off its pizza shooters, shrimp poppers and extreme fajitas appetizer ensemble.

Teachers Say Tech Helps Student Writing, but Encourages Shortcuts (Education Week/Digital Education)
From Twitter to whiteboards, digital technology has “tangible, beneficial impacts on student writing” and on writing instruction, according to nearly 2,500 middle and high school teachers surveyed by the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project. But those same teachers — most of whom are teaching highly capable students enrolled in Advanced Placement, honors and accelerated courses — also worry that those same technologies are making students more likely to “take shortcuts,” more likely to let the truncated language of text messages and social media “creep” into their research papers and less able to “produce a solid piece of writing containing a coherent and persuasive argument that synthesizes material well.” Pew Internet Some 78 percent of the 2,462 advanced placement and National Writing Project teachers surveyed say digital tools such as the Internet, social media and cell phones “encourage student creativity and personal expression.” According to teachers, students’ exposure to a broader audience for their work and more feedback from peers encourages greater student investment in what they write and in the writing process as a whole. ABC News Occasionally, Jennifer Woollven, an English teacher at West Lake High School in Austin, Texas, finds some Twitter speak — a FWIW or an “ur” — in a paper. But most of the time she finds that her students are paying a lot more attention when it comes to their writing assignments, especially when they know it might be shared via Twitter itself.

NBC News Digital to See More Social and User-Generated Content (LostRemote)
A year ago Tuesday, July 16, NBCUniversal completed its acquisition of MSNBC.com, picking up the half of the company owned by Microsoft. In an email to NBC News staffers Tuesday, NBC News Digital chief Vivian Schiller looked at the past year and previewed what is coming down the pipeline. In addition to new looks for NBCNews.com and MSNBC.com, Schiller revealed that there are a number of new changes coming soon, including “big social media platform initiatives.”

Google Reportedly in Search of Programming for an Online TV Service (ReadWrite)
Google is meeting with media companies to pitch an upcoming Internet TV service, a so-called over-the-top package that would offer cable channel bundles over online connections, The Wall Street Journal reports. This proposed service, for which Google is still currently seeking licensing, could potentially join a plethora of rumored Internet TV packages from companies like Intel.

MTV to Announce Video Music Awards Nominees Via Video on Instagram, Vine (AllFacebook)
MTV will reveal nominations for its upcoming Video Music Awards today via videos on video on Instagram and Vine, Mashable reported. The cable network will begin rolling out the videos at 8 a.m. ET today, adding one each hour, and Mashable reported that stop-motion animation creator Khoa Phan will create eight videos for the #RoadToTheVMAs campaign.

One Year After the IPO, Facebook Talent is Fleeing to Find the Next Big Thing (Business Insider)
Instagram’s lead designer, Tim Van Damme, is leaving Facebook. He’s heading for Dropbox, AllThingsD reports. Tuesday, another Facebook executive also announced his departure. Tom Arrix, Facebook’s head of North American sales, is leaving after seven years.

Tufts Asks Class of 2018 Applicants: ‘What Does #YOLO Mean to You?’ (AllTwitter)
Class of 2018 hopefuls can prove their social savvy to Tufts University thanks to the school’s unconventional application. Specifically, Tufts has issued a writing prompt to prospective students that asks them to answer, “What does #YOLO mean to you?”

Bitstrips Bootstraps Social Comics on Facebook to 10M Users and 50M Unique Cartoons (VentureBeat)
Zero to 10 million users in less than seven months might just make social cartoon startup Bitstrips the hottest startup you’ve never heard of. The Toronto-based bootstrapped company of 10 is built around a Facebook app that enables users to create unique, custom cartoons that allow you to illustrate your day, your feelings or your friends’ habits in humorous ways.

Instagram Lawsuit Over Terms of Service Dismissed in Court (SocialTimes)
A judge in San Francisco has dismissed a class action lawsuit filed against Instagram over an update to its terms of service. Prompted by consumers’ fears that the company would sell their photos without compensation, California resident Lucy Rodriguez and the law firm Finkelstein & Krinsk filed suit against the photo-sharing service just before the new terms, which included an arbitration clause preventing users from participating in class action lawsuits except under limited circumstances, could go into effect.

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