Sony announced today that it has hired Philip Reitinger, the former director of the U.S. National Cyber Security Center, for the newly created post of chief information security officer.

Do you remember that massive hacking of the Sony PlayStation Network a few months back? Sony clearly believes in locking the barn door after someone made off with the horse and had their way with the stable maid.

Mr. Reitinger will be an SVP and report to general counsel Nicole Seligman. “Certainly the network issue was a catalyst for the appointment,” a Sony spokesman said. “We are looking to bolster our network security even further.”

Rude comments aside, this is really something Sony should have done long ago. It was quietly known, in certain circles, that Sony’s network was not secure. The real story about the hacking isn’t that it happened but that it took so long to occur.

When did Sony become a company that responded to events instead of anticipating them? You can see this  in more than just their security; look at the new Sony Reader. It’s the model that Sony should have released last year, when it could have anticipated the launch of the similarly equipped Kobo Touch and Nook Touch.

When did Sony last innovate? Was it 2006, when it released the Sony Librie eReader in Japan?