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Mozilla, Reddit & BoingBoing Are Part of Online Surveillance Day Protest

thedaywefoughtbackMedia properties Mozilla, Reddit, BoingBoing have  joined Access, Demand Progress, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Fight for the Future, Free Press, and ThoughtWorks to participate in protest against NSA spying.

The event will take place on February 11th and is being called, The Day We Fight Back. Here is more about how Internet users can participate from the event’s site:

  1. Visit TheDayWeFightBack.org
  2. Sign up to indicate that you’ll participate and receive updates.
  3. Sign up to install widgets on websites encouraging its visitors to fight back against surveillance. (These are being finalized in coming days.)
  4. Use the social media tools on the site to announce your participation.
  5. Develop memes, tools, websites, and do whatever else you can to participate — and encourage others to do the same.

The protest is being held in honor of technology activist Aaron Swartz.

 

 

OR Books Tests Name-Your-Price eBook For ‘Hacking Politics’

OR Books has a new eBook available called Hacking Politics: How Geeks, Progressives, the Tea Party, Gamers, Anarchists and Suits Teamed Up to Defeat SOPA and Save the Internet and appropriately, the publisher is selling the eBook through a name-your-price model.

The book explores the history of the fight against SOPA, the Stop Online Piracy Act. It includes essays by: Aaron Swartz, Larry Lessig, Zoe Lofgren, Mike Masnick, Kim Dotcom, Nicole Powers, Tiffiny Cheng, Alexis Ohanian, and Cory Doctorow.

The publisher suggests that customers pay $10 for the download, but there is a drop down option to pay other amounts including: nothing, $2, $5, $25, $50 or $100.

When OR Books put out Julian Assange’s book  Cypherpunks: Freedom and the Future of the Internet back in December, they skipped Amazon and released it through eKiosk, a site that creators sell eBooks and music outside of major online marketplaces, through a network of smaller online shops.

Aaron Swartz Earns ALA’s James Madison Award

The late Aaron Swartz has been honored with the American Library Association’s James Madison Award, “for his dedication to promoting and protecting public access to research and government information.”

California representative Zoe Lofgren announced the award during the 15th Annual Freedom of Information Day in Washington, D.C. today. The award honors those individuals who have “championed, protected and promoted public access to government information and the public’s right to know national information.”

Robert Swartz, Aaron’s father, thanked the ALA for the award on his son’s behalf and explained that, Aaron loved libraries. “I remember how excited he was to get library privileges at Harvard and be able to use the Widener library there,” he stated. “I know he would have been humbled and honored to receive this award.”

Swartz, an Internet pioneer, killed himself in January, just a few weeks before facing trial after he cracked MIT computers and posted millions of scholarly documents from Jstor for free–he could have faced up to 30 years in prison in the controversial court case.

Amid Fallout Over Internet Activist’s Death, Poll Shows Most Americans Favor Mild Punishment for Illegal Downloads

Photo: Fred Benenson via Wikimedia Commons

The suicide of 26-year-old Reddit co-founder and open Internet activist Aaron Swartz late last week has reignited the debate over what should be publicly available online and how illegal distribution can be fairly prosecuted just as a new poll shows that just over 10 percent of Americans believe jail time is a reasonable punishment for those who download copyrighted material online.

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Scholars Post Free PDFs in Honor of Aaron Swartz

Internet pioneer Aaron Swartz killed himself last week, just a few weeks before facing trial after he cracked MIT computers and posted millions of scholarly documents from Jstor for free–he could have faced up to 30 years in prison in the controversial court case.

In honor of Swartz’s memory, scholars around the world are posting free PDF copies of their work at the #PDFTribute hashtag. Read more about his life and legacy at this tribute site.

UC Davis professor Jonathan Eisen posted more details: ”I should say, sharing your PDFs is not necessarily clearly not enough (the license on the PDF may affect what people can do with them if they feel constrained to follow the law).  It is also critical to think about the level of openness of a paper, but I will save most of the comments on that for another time. What I wanted to do here is point out various ways to share PDFs for people who don’t know how … UPDATE 1/14: See follow up post 10 things you can do to REALLY support #OpenAccess #PDFTribute” (image via)

Social Media Newsfeed: Ex-Redditor Dies | Golden Globes Live-Tweets

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Former Redditor Aaron Swartz Dies at Age 26 (SocialTimes)
Aaron Swartz, an early employee of the link-sharing site reddit, is dead at the age of 26, the Associated Press has confirmed. The 26-year-old programmer and Internet activist reportedly hanged himself in his Brooklyn apartment weeks before he was to appear in court for illegally downloading millions of scholarly articles.

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