Carl Icahn

Social Media Newsfeed: New York Times Turns to Facebook Notes | SocialTimes Live-Tweeting at NASA

TheNewYorkTimesNotes

‘The New York Times’ Posts Full Stories as Facebook Notes During Website Outage (AllFacebook)
When The New York Times suffered a site outage Wednesday, the newspaper turned to Facebook notes to post some key stories in their entirety. The Times said in a post on its Facebook page Wednesday afternoon: “As you may be aware, the Times is experiencing a server issue that has resulted in our website being temporarily unavailable. We expect the site to be restored soon. In the meantime, we are publishing key news articles in their entirety here on Facebook.

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Social Media Newsfeed: Yelp Mobile App Reviews | Facebook for Celebrities

YelpMobile

Yelp Update: Users Can Now Post Reviews Straight from Their iPhones (SocialTimes)
For reviews of local businesses that just can’t wait until the writer gets home, Yelp has updated its mobile app to let users post reviews straight from their phones. Instant mobile reviews are something that competing apps like Foursquare have had for a while now, but Yelp’s version is just rolling out Tuesday on iOS and will launch on the Android sometime in the near future.

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Netflix Adopts Stockholder Rights Plan to Protect Against a Hostile Takeover

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Video streaming service Netflix is protecting against a hostile takeover with the adoption of a stockholder rights plan, the company announced today. According to Netflix, “The Rights Plan is intended to protect Netflix and its stockholders from efforts to obtain control of Netflix that the Board of Directors determines are not in the best interests of Netflix and its stockholders, and to enable all stockholders to realize the long-term value of their investment in Netflix.” According to everyone else, the Rights Plan is intended to stop investor Carl Icahn from purchasing more of the company than he already has.

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Yahoo Names Two CEOs to Board to Please Icahn

Yahoo announced that it will add the former Viacom and Nextel Partners CEOs to its board of directors, the Associated Press reports. These two fellows were recommendations from billionaire investor Carl Icahn; the move was widely expected as part of the company’s deal to ward off a proxy fight with Icahn.

Neither of the two new board members have experience leading an Internet company, but both have plenty of tech industry experience otherwise. “[Frank Biondi Jr]‘s extensive experience in the entertainment and media industries, combined with [John Chapple]‘s deep management experience in telecommunications, will provide valuable perspectives to our already diverse board,” Yahoo Chairman Roy Bostock said in a statement.

There’s also a risk that there are too many cooks in the kitchen, the article said. “The fate of Yahoo is not going to change by any addition of these board members,” said Global Equities Research analyst Trip Chowdry in the article. “This is a blessing for the competition.”

Icahn Joins Yahoo Board, Bakes Cupcakes for Other Members

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Yahoo’s board has confirmed billionaire investor Carl Icahn as a director, as Robert Kotick resigned as part of a previously announced deal, Reuters is reporting. The move went exactly as planned—and sans fireworks—given that Icahn was given a board seat in order to avoid a proxy battle over Microsoft’s failed attempt to buy out the venerable Internet portal.

The report said that analysts expect Icahn and the new directors to pressure the board to consider a variety of strategic options for the company, including another shot at a potential transaction with Microsoft, as well as disposal of Yahoo’s substantial Asian assets. Icahn still owns 5% of the company’s outstanding shares.

Fortune: Motorola Sticking With Breakup Plan

Motorola_KRZRs.jpgAs we reported late yesterday, Motorola has hired Sanjay Jha from Qualcomm in order to head up the company’s handset business and act as co-CEO. As Fortune writes, the move comes just months after Motorola said it would separate the handset business from the rest of the companies, in an olive branch to dissident shareholder Carl Icahn.

“Critics of the splitup plan say little will be accomplished by breaking Motorola’s money-losing handset business off from its profitable networking and enterprise mobility operations,” the report said. Fortune has previously claimed that the move will mean higher costs and less access to resources in the future.

With the new executive in place to run the division, Motorola has officially dug in its heels, even as they continue to lose market share at an alarming rate.

Yahoo Board Meeting begins with Icahn AWOL

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Today is D-Day for Yahoo’s current board—and Carl Icahn is nowhere to be found. The Associated Press reports that Yahoo shareholders are finally getting their chance today to challenge the company’s management over its handling of a $47.5 billion takeover bid from Microsoft Corp.

The article said that Yahoo Chairman Roy Bostock began by greeting investors at the Internet company’s long-awaited annual meeting Friday. “The atmosphere is expected to become tense as Bostock and Yahoo CEO Jerry Yang begin fielding questions from shareholders.”

Meanwhile, a separate AP report said that “nettlesome investor” Carl Icahn has “piped down and won’t even be at the Internet company’s annual meeting Friday,” despite the fact that he’s going to join the board next week. The plot thickens.

(Image credit: Reuters)

AP: Ousted AOL Chief Could Advise Yahoo

AOL_Mobile_Web.jpgIn the ongoing Microhoo saga, a lot of analysts are weighing in as to what could help fix the situation and move it forward. But The Associated Press has a specific person in mind: former AOL chief Jonathan F. Miller.

“In his four-plus years as chairman and chief executive of Time Warner’s AOL unit, Miller made key acquisitions, including Advertising.com for $435 million in 2004, along with a crucial decision to shed AOL’s roots in dial-up Internet access and give away content once reserved for paying subscribers,” the report said. “Miller, 51, could similarly offer Yahoo a strategic vision it needs to overcome its malaise.”

The name came up because billionaire investor Carl Icahn said Monday that Miller is a candidate for one of the two open board seats, the ones he gets in the deal that avoids the battle for Yahoo’s control. And AOL and Yahoo have a lot of things in common, since they’re both struggling Internet portals from an earlier era, with many of the same concerns.

CNNMoney.com: Microhoo Saga ‘Isn’t Over Yet’

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Even though Yahoo has settled with billionaire investor Carl Icahn, CNNMoney.com reports, Microsoft is still looking for a deal of some kind—and Jerry Yang‘s days as Yahoo CEO may be numbered.

Currently, it’s less likely that Microsoft will strike a deal with Yahoo; in fact, the company’s shares went up slightly yesterday, which columnist Paul R. La Monica called “a possible sigh of relief from investors that the company isn’t going to be spending more than $40 billion on Yahoo.”

Still, Scott Kessler, an equity analyst with Standard & Poor’s, said it’s not over yet. “Microsoft has pursued Yahoo now for the better part of two years. Just because their ally Carl Icahn has aligned himself more squarely with Yahoo’s management does not mean that a deal won’t eventually happen,” he said. Meanwhile, all eyes are on Yahoo; another bad quarter could mean it’s over for Yang. Either way, it’s certainly not over for us spectators.