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Kindle

Rumor: Amazon Working On New Kindle Fires

Amazon is rumored to be working on two new Kindle Fire tablets, a 10-inch version and a new 7-inch “Coyote” version.

Boy Genius Report has more: “Earlier reports suggested that Amazon will announce a new addition to its Kindle Fire lineup late next month and while we cannot speak to the timing of Amazon’s upcoming announcements, BGR has confirmed that Amazon is indeed finally readying the launch of its 10-inch tablet.”

Last week Google released the Nexus 7, a 7-inch tablet computer that is a direct competitor with the Kindle Fire, in that it is designed to consume digital media content like apps, music, books and movies from Google Play. Right after Google put the new tablet on presale, we heard rumors that Google is planning to launch a 10″ tablet itself.  (The sources were right about the Nexus 7, so it’s possible that this rumor is accurate).

Elevator Pitch: Storyville Wants to Do for Short Stories What iTunes Did for Music

In the latest episode of mediabistroTV’s “Elevator Pitch,” host Alan Meckler meets with Storyville co-founder Paul Vidich. Storyville is a mobile app for short stories that connects readers and authors. A former music executive, Vidich helped Steve Jobs bring music singles to iTunes. He hopes Storyville will do for the short story what iTunes did for the single.

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Elevator Pitch: Storyville Wants to Do for Short Stories What iTunes Did for Music

In the latest episode of mediabistroTV’s “Elevator Pitch,” host Alan Meckler meets with Storyville co-founder Paul Vidich. Storyville is a mobile app for short stories that connects readers and authors. A former music executive, Vidich helped Steve Jobs bring music singles to iTunes. He hopes Storyville will do for the short story what iTunes did for the single.

For more videos, check out our YouTube channel and follow us on Twitter: @mediabistroTV

Also, find out who’s hiring on the Mediabistro job board.

Sharing Books is as Old as Print. But, Publishers have a Problem with eBook Sharing

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Sharing a conventional paper book has been one of the most basic sharing activities for a long time. Sharing comes in the form of informal person-to-person lending or institutionalized library loans. This simplest and most basic of sharing activities has been, however, something that has not been easily adopted for digital books. The latest ebook sharing issue comes by way of the world’s largest trade book publisher, Penguin Books. The Digital Shift reported that…
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Kindle Cloud Reader for the Desktop and iPad: All You Need is a Browser

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Amazon and other ebook reader app providers recently had to modify their iPad apps to comply with Apple’s policy for not allowing links that lead to the purchase of content from outside of the in-app purchase mechanism. Amazon just made available a new service that could eventually lead to working completely around Apple’s policies. Amazon’s new cloud based web ebook reading service works with desktop browsers (Chrome and Safari) as well as the iPad’s Safari mobile browser.

Kindle Cloud Reader

Here’s how it works:
1. Point Safari mobile at read.amazon.com
2. Sign-in to your Amazon account
3. Increase the browser’s database size when prompted
4. Add a shortcut to the web app on the iPad’s home screen
5. Select and read any of the ebooks you’ve already purchased

The Kindle Cloud Reader can hold the contents off the ebook locally so that it can be read even when offline. The web app’s page turning felt fast and smooth when I tried it. However, accessing the controls hidden controls did not feel comfortable to me. The web app does not support multimedia books with audio content. The web app is also iPad specific. Amazon advises iPhone users to use the native Kindle app.

Via TechCrunch: Amazon’s Answer To Apple’s Terms: A Web-Based Kindle Cloud Reader — Brilliant On PC, Better On iPad

Amazon Kindle Textbook Rentals: Possible Cost Savings This School Year?

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Anyone who has bought school textbooks knows about the relatively large price it adds to education. In 2006, the U.S. Department of Education issued a report titled An Economic Analy[s]is of Textbook Pricing and Textbook Markets (and yes, there is a spelling error in its title) which said:

Between 1986 and 2004, textbook prices rose 186 percent in the United States, or slightly more than six percent per year (GAO, 2005). Meanwhile, other prices rose only about three percent per year (GAO, 2005).

Students may find it profitable to purchase the economics textbook from a British bookseller and then pay to have it
transported back to the United States.

For example, in mid-July 2006, Barnes and Noble’s (U.S.) website offered to sell a new copy of Krugman and Wells’ Economics textbook for $126.75, whereas Blackwell’s in Great Britain advertised the same book on its web site at $76.31. Needless to say, it does not cost $50.44 to send the book from Oxford to the United States.

There may be a simpler way to save money on textbooks for the coming school year, however. Amazon announced:

Students Can Now Save Up To 80% with Kindle Textbook Rental

The “up to 80%” off goes into play if the rental is for a 30-day period. Rental periods can be any length between 30 and 360 days. Amazon says the books are “Rent Once, Read Everywhere.” This means that any of the Kindle readings apps or the Kindle itself can be used to read the rented textbook.

There is the possibility that a textbook owner could sell the textbook after the school year and incur less of a cost than renting the textbook.

You can find the Kindle Textbook rental site at:

www.amazon.com/kindletextbooks

FYI: Another interesting commentary on the reasons for the perceived high costs of school textbooks can be found in this Billings Gazette article:

Why are textbook costs so high?