We can’t do much to about the weather but most of us like to talk about it anyway. So, why not organize this weather information sharing? I took a look at the free Weddar for iPhone and Android earlier this year and came away unimpressed because, as I wrote earlier, While a crowd sourced social weather app seems like a good idea, its dependence on the crowd instead of conventional weather sensors means that its usefulness is greater or lesser depending on how many people participate. From what I can see, there are now fewer U.S. data points available compared to this past April when I tried the iPhone version.

Weathermob is another free app that also provides a social weather experience. However, unlike Weddar, Weathermob provides actual current and forecast weather information making it immediately useful without even looking at its social features.

Weathermob’s most appealing feature is the “Latest” tab where people share their own descriptions of current weather conditions in their area along with their own photos and videos. Being able to literally “see” what the weather looks like in various parts of the world is a compelling and interesting experience.

Like Weddar, unfortunately, Weathermob does not have any presence in my area. This could change. But, until some critical mass is achieved it does not have much utility from a local weather point of view.

Weathermob can authenticate with Facebook and Twitter to find friends using the app. Unfortunatley, not of my Facebook friends are using Weathermob right now. And, attempting to authenticate with Twitter resulted in the app crashing.

Via The Next Web: Discussing the weather? There’s an app for that