We first brought you OpenSignal’s crowdsourced weather data from Weather Signal in May, but since then, the team have discovered that there was a correlation between your phone’s battery and the weather outside. It’s not black magic after all!

Of course you don’t need an app to tell you how hot it is, unless you live in San Francisco, where a five minute walk can have you adding layers faster than you can say fog.  The weather here is based on microclimates, and no matter how much predictions you are given, non are as useful as real data, from someone down the street. It’s not exactly rocket science, but it’s better than asking someone if they are hot – the technology relies on your phone’s battery to detect the temperature, humidity, and even light. With so many smartphones in use, their data is a lot more efficient than the installation of weather stations.

OpenSignal

According to their research, ” While each of the cities already has established weather stations, according to the new method’s creators it could one day make predictions possible at a much finer scale of time and space than is currently feasible. Whereas today, weather reports typically provide one temperature for an entire city and a handful of readings expected throughout a day, the technique could lead to continuously updated weather predictions at a city block resolution.”

You can see real time weather data on the WeatherSignal’s map. 

You can read the published findings in Geophysical Research Letters.